New History Ireland PODCAST

This Podcast is part of the History Ireland Hedge School programme supported by the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht under the Decade of Centenaries 2012- 2023 initiative.

Soviets, strikes and land seizures—class conflict & the Tan War

In the midst of the War of Independence a parallel class war raged, with strikes, land-seizures and even the establishment of soviets.

What was its relationship to the national struggle?

And why did it seem to dissipate?

To answer these and related questions, listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, in discussion with Sarah-Anne Buckley (NUI Galway), John Cunningham (NUI Galway), Brian Hanley (TCD) and Mary Muldowny (Dublin City Council Historian-in-Residence).

This Hedge School, supported by the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht and in association with Galway Trades Council, was recorded and is available as a podcast here:

https://podcasts.apple.com/…/p…/history-ireland/id1503109266

https://www.historyireland.com/hedge-schools/

PANELLISTS

Dr Sarah-Anne Buckley, Department of History, NUIG, is an internationally recognised scholar in the field of modern Irish social history, particularly in the fields of Irish gender history, History of child welfare in Ireland and Britain, Women’s History, Institutional Histories and Youth Culture.

Dr John Cunningham is the Director of Taught MA, Department of History, NUIG and a former editor of Saothar: journal of Irish Labour History, John Cunningham’s research interests include Irish local history, the moral economy, and global syndicalism with a specialist interest in Labour Biography; Transnational Syndicalism; Social Protest and Moral Economy; Irish Local History; History of Urban Galway; History of Irish Education and Modern Ireland Labour Movements – Irish and Transnational.

Dr Brian Hanley (TCD), specialist interests include Irish republicanism, labour and radicalism, 1918 General Election, the 1916 Easter Rising, the Irish revolution and Civil War, trans-national aspects of the Irish revolution, 1969 and the birth of the ‘Troubles’, class in 20th century Ireland, the Great War and the Irish Revolution, Irish America, race and the Irish in America, the Northern Ireland conflict, the impact of the ‘Troubles’ and the Irish Republic.

Dr Mary Muldowney is the Dublin City Council Historian in Residence for Dublin Central. A graduate of Trinity College Dublin, she is the author of books, journal articles, blogs and broadcasts on labour and public history, frequently using oral history interviews as a primary source in her research and publications. This includes the history of women workers; the pro-choice movement in Ireland; women and war and working-class history. In her role as Historian in Residence, she has been involved in promoting the study of history through engagement with the public in libraries, community centers, schools, and museums.

Tommy Graham (History Ireland magazine) Tommy Graham, a history graduate of Trinity College, is one of the founders of History Ireland magazine and has been its editor since its beginning in 1993. He is an experienced broadcaster and lecturer, currently lecturing in history and politics at Griffith College. He also founded (1986) and continues to run, Historical Walking Tours of Dublin.

About History Ireland Hedge Schools

The History Ireland Hedge Schools, developed by Tommy Graham, are a public history format for making high quality research accessible to a general audience and are lively, unfettered debates on a range of historical topics.

 

For media interviews on History Ireland Hedge Schools contact Tommy Graham, editor History Ireland magazine and Hedge School ‘Master’. editor@historyireland.com

 

About the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023
The objective of the State programme for the period 2020-2023 is to ensure a deeper understanding of a complex period in our history, including the Struggle for Independence, the Civil War, the Foundation of the State and Partition and that these events and others are marked appropriately.

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